Posts

Showing posts from October, 2008

MISTRESS MARY QUITE CONTRARY (3)

Note: the whole book is recorded in separate chapters, the audio files we can find here.

Mary sat in her corner of the railway carriage and looked plain and fretful. She had nothing to read or to look at, and she had folded her thin little black-gloved hands in her lap. Her black dress made her look yellower than ever, and her limp light hair straggled from under her black crepe hat.

"A more marred-looking young one I never saw in my life," Mrs. Medlock thought. (Marred is a Yorkshire word and means spoiled and pettish.) She had never seen a child who sat so still without doing anything; and at last she got tired of watching her and began to talk in a brisk, hard voice.

"I suppose I may as well tell you something about where you are going to," she said. "Do you know anything about your uncle?" "No," said Mary. "Never heard your father and mother talk about him?" "No," said Mary frowning. She frowned because she remembered that …

MISTRESS MARY QUITE CONTRARY (2)

Note: the whole book is recorded in separate chapters, the audio files we can find here.


"Perhaps if her mother had carried her pretty face and her pretty manners oftener into the nursery Mary might have learned some pretty ways too. It is very sad, now the poor beautiful thing is gone, to remember that many people never even knew that she had a child at all."

"I believe she scarcely ever looked at her," sighed Mrs. Crawford. "When her Ayah was dead there was no one to give a thought to the little thing. Think of the servants running away and leaving her all alone in that deserted bungalow. Colonel McGrew said he nearly jumped out of his skin when he opened the door and found her standing by herself in the middle of the room."

Mary made the long voyage to England under the care of an officer's wife, who was taking her children to leave them in a boarding-school. She was very much absorbed in her own little boy and girl, and was rather glad to hand the ch…

MISTRESS MARY QUITE CONTRARY (1)

Some activities before reading the next chapter. Answer these questions:Who is the main character of the book?How old was she when cholera broke out?Describe Mary’s character.In which country does the action begin?What does Mary’s father do for a living?With what kind of people her mother used to hanging out?Explain the meaning of the title of the first chapter.Some words to repeat:disagreeable-looking, held a position under, gay people, handed her over to the care of, fretful, cross, stammered , slink, muttering, grinding her teeth, disdaining, imploringly, wring, wailing, scarcely, queer, desolation, startle, rustle, glinding


CHAPTER II

MISTRESS MARY QUITE CONTRARY


Mary had liked to look at her mother from a distance and she had thought her very pretty, but as she knew very little of her she could scarcely have been expected to love her or to miss her very much when she was gone. She did not miss her at all, in fact, and as she was a self-absorbed child she gave her entire thought to h…

There is no on left (3)

Many things happened during the hours in which she slept so heavily, but she was not disturbed by the wails and the sound of things being carried in and out of the bungalow.

When she awakened she lay and stared at the wall. The house was perfectly still. She had never known it to be so silent before. She heard neither voices nor footsteps, and wondered if everybody had got well of the cholera and all the trouble was over. She wondered also who would take care of her now her Ayah was dead. There would be a new Ayah, and perhaps she would know some new stories. Mary had been rather tired of the old ones. She did not cry because her nurse had died. She was not an affectionate child and had never cared much for any one. The noise and hurrying about and wailing over the cholera had frightened her, and she had been angry because no one seemed to remember that she was alive. Everyone was too panic-stricken to think of a little girl no one was fond of. When people had the cholera it…