19 Jan 2011

BBC documentaries

I love watching BBC documentaries. They are highly informative, educative and really enjoyable. The level of knowledge they represent is second to none, as well as the technique and the way of presentation. All of them are like the best lectures by the best professors. 

As they are produced and performed by the highly educated specialists of the fields given, the English used by them is like the people, at the very high level of the vocabulary with many interesting metaphors. The mine of the modern yet not street argot, a source it is worth learning from. 

Baroque! - From St Peter's to St Paul's

Spectacular three-part series, exploring the Baroque tradition in many of its key locations. Starting in Italy and following the spread of the wildfire across Europe and beyond, art critic Waldemar Januszczak takes a tour of the best examples of Baroque to be found, and tells the best stories behind those works.

Episode Three brings the Baroque home with an exploration of the English Baroque tradition that finds its climax through a tour of London's Hawksmoor churches, and Christopher Wren's iconic St Paul's Cathedral.

Here I wrote down some structures used in this documentary. Hope to write any story to use them by myself. 

  • spreading like a wildfire across Europe
  • emotional and flamboyant art 
  • a half-timbered, medieval hotch-potch of higgledy-piggledy Tudor DIY
  • rabid suspicion 
  • the sinful, idolatrous, abdominal art
  • the stupendous riverside vista at Greenwich
  • the first purpose-built scientific establishment 
  • to enlarge a tiny crack into a giant opening
  • to have a patchy record in the matters of art
  • a hugely discombobulating fact 
  • to say the least
  • his eyes were opened to the delights of art
  • to get into contact 
  • thereby affirming the divine rights of the kings

1 comments:

internet marketing said...

I don't have opportunity to practice it with native speakers in real life. What's the best way to do it through Internet?