16 Jan 2015

Anaphora

Anaphora is a figure of repetition; it is the repetition of a word or a phrase at the beginning of the successive clauses, sentences or lines.

SONG OF MYSELF

Walt Whitman

42
A call in the midst of the crowd,
My own voice, orotund sweeping and final.

Come my children,
Come my boys and girls, my women, household and intimates,
Now the performer launches his nerve, he has pass’d his prelude on the reeds
within.
Easily written loose-finger’d chords—I feel the thrum of your climax and close.

My head slues round on my neck,
Music rolls, but not from the organ,
Folks are around me, but they are no household of mine.

Ever the hard unsunk ground,
Ever the eaters and drinkers, ever the upward and downward sun, ever the air
and the ceaseless tides,
Ever myself and my neighbors, refreshing, wicked, real,
Ever the old inexplicable query, ever that thorn’d thumb, that breath of itches
and thirsts,
Ever the vexer’s hoot! hoot! till we find where the sly one hides and bring him
forth,
Ever love, ever the sobbing liquid of life,
Ever the bandage under the chin, ever the trestles of death.

In the last part, there are many instances of anaphora of a word: ever.Next step in understanding the figure of speech is answering the question: why the poet uses this particular tool? One of the answers may be that 'ever' unites all these ideas and unites all people.

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