Mastering pronouns

Mastering writing in English is not easy. On one hand, we need to employ the variety of sentence structures in our writing, and on the other - be in full control of the pieces which may be differently ordered. Also, it is important to be able to use different pronouns as subjects and objects to avoid repetition, when not wanted.
The English language is rich in pronouns: there are nine categories of them.
  1. Subject Pronouns - I, you, she - always function as subject of a sentence.
  2. Objective Pronouns - me, him, her, us, you, them - they are always the objects of the action: direct, indirect or the object of a preposition.
  3. Indefinite Pronouns - may function as subjects or objects: there are three subcategories of them: singular (someone, anybody, each, one, little, either), plural (many, others, several, few), both (all, any, some, none, more, most).
  4. Relative Pronouns - they introduce relative clauses: that, which, whom, whose 
  5. Demonstrative Pronouns - may function as subjects, objects and adjectives: this, that, these, those.
  6. Possessive Pronouns - function as subjects, objects and adjectives: my/mine, your/yours.
  7. Interrogative Pronouns - can replace subjects: who, what, which, whose
  8. Reflexive Pronouns - myself, yourself, ourselves - show subjects performing actions on themselves.
  9. Intensive Pronouns - myself, yourself, ourselves - modify/emphasize a noun or pronoun
Here in the passage below, I tried to use some indefinite pronouns as subjects/objects as a part of my written assessment, next step is to get rid of all linking verbs: all forms of 'be' and change them into the action verbs.

The elevator trip (1)
It was Sunday, one of those last lazy days of winter when Spring impatiently gave signs of its readiness to show its full beauty. Small, yellow crocuses on my mind that I saw just before on the green grass in the park, I peacefully strode toward the tube station, not really happy that I was leaving daylight for underground. Rather absent-mindedly, I took the step on the elevator, watching the other people that also absent-mindedly let the running monster take them into the mouth of its opening. Few with more energy walked down, passing by the lethargic majority: rushing in the UK is pretty unusual, especially on such a day. Then, the sudden commotion broke into the silent purr of the engines; someone was jumping down the elevator. Those who turned back their heads - and I did it, too - witnessed a young man skipping on the moving steps in a great hurry. Breathlessly, we gaped at his long legs storming down the moving stairs without missing a single step, and when the legs disappeared everyone was relieved - he did it and did not break a leg. Well done!


The elevator trip (2)
It was Sunday; one of those last lazy days of winter when Spring impatiently gives signs of its readiness to show its full beauty. Small, yellow crocuses on my mind that I saw just before on the grass in the park, I peacefully strode toward the tube station, not really happy that I was leaving daylight for underground. Rather absent-mindedly, I took the step into the elevator, glazing over the other people that also absent-mindedly let the running monster slowly swallow them down. Few, with more energy, walked down, passing by the lethargic majority: hurrying in the UK is pretty unusual, especially on such a day. Then, the sudden rush broke into the murmur of the engines; someone was dashing down the elevator. Those, who turned back their heads - and I did it, too - witnessed a young man galloping on the moving steps in a great hurry. Breathlessly, we gaped at his long legs storming down the moving stairs without missing a single step, and when the legs disappeared everyone was relieved - he did it and did not break a leg. Well done!

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